Interview with Linda Bond, author of Alive at 5 – Win a $25 Amazon/B&N Gift Card!

Title: Alive at 5
Author: Linda Bond
Publisher: Entangled Ignite
Pages: 249
Genre: Romantic Suspense
Format: Ebook

TV news reporter Samantha Steele is one panic attack away from losing her job. Future on the line and cameraman in tow, she follows her mentor on an exhilarating adventure vacation. When he dies while skydiving, her investigative instincts scream “murdered”, and lead her to gorgeous thrill-seeker Zack Hunter.

Zack is an undercover police officer investigating his uncle’s death through the same adventure vacation company. Samantha is a thorn in his side the moment they meet. Not only is she investigating the same case, but the emotionally wounded loner doesn’t want another partner, especially one whose goal is to splash evidence all over the evening news. But Samantha’s persistence is quite a turn-on, and Zack’s overpowering desire makes it harder for him to push her away.

When the killer turns his attention to Zack, Samantha might be the only one who can save him, forcing the anxiety-riddled correspondent to finally face her greatest fear.

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Thank you for your time in answering our questions. Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to write a book?

I’ve been dreaming up characters and conflicts forever. When my step-dad took us hiking, and I got bored, I’d create stories in my head to pass the time. I didn’t actually write any of the stories down until high school. A very busy professional life as a journalist and five kids kept me too busy for years to spend the time required to write a really good book.  But, once I joined our local RWA group (Tampa Area Romance Writers), the desire to write fiction became too strong to ignore. I learned from my fellow writers that it’s important to take the time to learn your craft, so it’s taken years to see Alive at 5 in print.

Is this your first book?

This is my first book, but I’ve already completed two others. Cuba Undercover is based on my own real life love story.  I met my husband while on assignment in Cuba. If you head to www.lindabond.com you can read a synopsis and see pictures from my actual trip. The third book I wrote is a women’s fiction book called Glory, Glory, the Majorettes are 40. It’s a tale of five former college majorettes who meet again after 18 years apart to find they have little in common now. When one of their friends disappears, the others must work together to find her. Each must face their own mid-life crisis before their journey ends and their lost friend is found.

Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?

It’s been a long one. (She smiles as she writes this.) Alive at 5 did well on the RWA contest circuit, so I never gave up on it. What I did was put it down and write two more books. Then, when I picked up Alive at 5 again, I was a better writer, and it sold almost right away.  I pitched it to an Entangled editor at RWA. ( The annual Romance Writer of America’s conference ) She requested it, but passed it on to another Entangled editor. About a year later it’s up on Amazon and for sale.

What lessons do you feel you learned about the publishing industry?

Now that I’ve had a chance to go through the editing process with a publisher, I’m learning how hard those on the other side work too.  I’ve emailed my editors, publicist etc at nine at night because that’s when I have the time to work on my fiction. I usually get an email right back.  We’re all working hard and trying to make a living.  We’re all in this together.

If you had the chance to change something regarding how you got published, what would you change?

It would have happened faster!  LOL No, I believe everything happens for a reason, and Alive at 5 is a faster, better read because of the two editors I worked with at Entangled. Thanks Nina Bruhns and Kate Fall!

Did you credit any person or organization with helping you get published?

Well, Nina Bruhns picked me out of her slush pile and said those magic words, “I love your voice.”  And I’ve loved my experience working with Entangled Publishing. But I’ve had many writer friends help me, give me advice and inspire me including Vella Day, Julie Leto and Karen Rose.

What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?

Don’t give up.  I’ve never been in this for the money. (That’s probably a good thing because I would have starved!) I write because I love it, and I can’t stop.  Write what you love and love what you write.

Author Linda Bond was born in San Francisco, California but spent most of her life in the south, attending middle and high school in Greenville, South Carolina and college at the University of Georgia in Athens, Georgia.

She’s worked as a television news reporter and anchor in Fort Myers, Orlando and Tampa, Florida. For the past fifteen years, she’s been a health reporter, sharing important information with viewers on the latest medical breakthroughs and writing emotional, human-interest stories on those who have the courage and spirit to fight for their lives.

She writes every day, under deadline, but has always loved losing herself in a good fiction story. Her love for writing fiction actually started in high school, but a thriving, busy professional life, along with five kids, kept her busy for many years.

Entangled Publishing is releasing her debut romantic adventure, Alive at 5, July 14th 2014.

She has received numerous writing awards in Romance Writer’s of America chapter contests for Alive at 5 and her other manuscripts Cuba Undercover and Glory, Glory the Majorettes are 40.

She has also won 12 Emmy awards, numerous Society of Professional Journalist, and Associated Press awards, as well as a Florida Bar award and Edward R. Murrow award.

This former baton-twirling beauty queen from the Deep South, now lives in Tampa, Florida with her husband, adopted son from Cuba, two daughters, and one stubborn Bulldog named Sanford.

Her latest book is the romantic suspense novel, Alive at 5.

For More Information

Linda is giving away a $25 Amazon/B&N Gift Card!

Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • 1 winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter.
  • This giveaway begins July 14 and ends on July 25.
  • Winners will be contacted via email on Monday, July 28 .
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

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Interview with Lisa Burstein, author of The Possibility of Us


TPoU_1600 (1)Title
: The Possibility of Us
Author: Lisa Burstein
Publisher: Entangled Embrace
Pages: 150
Genre: Contemporary
Format: Ebook

One weekend together could change everything…

When her friend called to tell her about the funeral, Cassie wanted to say no. She had enough to handle with her own hollow existence. But she knew she should pay her respects to her old camp counselor…as long as her ex, Ben, wouldn’t be there.

Except Ben is there. Still gorgeous, still angry, and still able to penetrate her defenses with one intense stare. All the reasons they left each other in a flurry of heartache start to fall away over one long, snowy weekend.

But tough Cassie can’t truly open up to Ben when she knows confessing her secrets will leave her raw, defenseless. And the possibility of forever might not be enough to gamble on all the impossibilities of now.

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Is this your first book?
No it’s my fourth.
Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?
I started publishing 3 years ago, but my journey started almost fifteen years ago. I received my MFA in Fiction and then wrote my first book, it took me almost five years to get it published. Within that time I had two agents and it was shopped to several publishers.
What lessons do you feel you learned about the publishing industry?
Never give up, also anything can happen and anything can change. Also MAKE FRIENDS with people, writers, bloggers, readers, and other authors your support system is everything.
If you had the chance to change something regarding how you got published, what would you change?
I would probably want to take the anxiety out of it. So much of being on the other side of being published is filled with worry about how good your book will do, if people will like it. I’d love to have been able to go back and tell myself not to worry because you have many more books to write.
Did you credit any person or organization with helping you get published?
My agent. My group of friends in “the pit” and most definitely my editor.
What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?
Everyone says it, but it’s really true: WRITE, WRITE, WRITE the only way to get better is to practice. I’m still getting better.

Thank you for your time in answering our questions  Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to write a book?Is this your first book?

No it’s my fourth.Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey? I started publishing 3 years ago, but my journey started almost fifteen years ago. I received my MFA in Fiction and then wrote my first book, it took me almost five years to get it published. Within that time I had two agents and it was shopped to several publishers.

Lisa Burstein is a tea seller by day and a writer by night. She received her MFA in Creative Writing from the Inland Northwest Center for Writers at Eastern Washington University. She is the author of Pretty Amy, The Next Forever, Dear Cassie and Sneaking Candy. She lives in Portland, Oregon with her very patient husband, a neurotic dog and two cats.

Her latest book is the contemporary romance, The Possibility of Us.

For More Information

  • Visit Lisa Burstein’s website.
  • Connect with Lisa on Facebook.
  • Connect with Lisa on Twitter.

Lisa is giving away 2 Believe in Love or Dwell in Possibility Pendants (US only) and two $15 Amazon gift cards!

Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • Four winners will be chosen via Rafflecopter.
  • This giveaway begins July 1 and ends on July 15.
  • Winners will be contacted via email on Thursday, July 17 .
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

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Interview with Michelle McLean, author of Romancing the Rumrunner

RTRR_500Title: Romancing the Rumrunner
Genre: Historical Romance
Author: Michelle McLean
Publisher: Entangled Scandalous
Language: English
Pages: 203
Format: Ebook

Prohibition Era Chicago

She’s worked too hard to be run out of town…

Jessica Harlan spends her nights as The Phoenix, the owner of the most popular speakeasy in town. Her days are spent running her respectable butcher shop and dodging prohibition agents and rival club owners who all want to put her out of business.

He’s worked too hard to let his heart get in the way…

When the opportunity arises to go undercover for the Feds to catch The Phoenix, Gumshoe Anthony Solomon jumps on it. But he never suspected the notorious rumrunner would be a dame – or that he’d be so drawn to the feisty little minx.

They play a dangerous game of cat and mouse, knowing they can’t trust the other, but unable to walk away. While their hearts dodge the crossfire, the mobsters raise the stakes, and even The Phoenix may not rise again.

AMAZONBARNES & NOBLE

Thank you for your time in answering our questions

Let’s begin by having you explain to us why you decided to write a book?

Honestly, I’m not sure :-) I’ve always written stories, even when I was little. My mom saved one I wrote back when I was four :) I always thought it would be amazing to write for a living, but I never thought of it as a viable job option, just as some elusive dream that I’d let go of once I grew up. And one day I just decided to try and get published. Figured I had nothing to lose, but I’d for sure never be published if I never tried. I think I just wanted to see if I could do it :)

Is this your first book?

Romancing the Rumrunner is my seventh book (my sixth novel – I also have a educational NF book out).

Can you tell us a little about your publishing journey?

I queried my first book for probably 2 years (with a million rewrites and resubs in there) and then on a whim wrote a NF book on how to write essays and term papers. I had an agent within a few weeks and a publisher deal within a couple months. But fiction is what I wanted to focus on and my agent only repped NF, so we parted ways and I queried again. I was about to self publish my novel when I thought I’d give it a last ditch effort with a few of the new small publishers who didn’t require an agent. I had two solid offers and a “maybe” within a few weeks. A complete shock since I’d queried that poor book for so long ;-) I chose Entangled and it was the best decision I’ve ever made.

What lessons do you feel you learned about the publishing industry?

(In no particular order) 1. It requires a LOT of patience. Everything is hurry up and wait, and wait, and wait some more ;-) 2. When I first started out, I was really intimidated by industry professionals. But editors, agents, and especially other writers are, for the most part, just regular people. Most are genuinely nice and awesomely entertaining. 3. This is a relatively small industry – always be courteous and professional. You never want to burn a bridge you may need to cross someday. 4. There are a lot of distractions that come with this job – marketing, social media, and everything that goes along with publishing can sometimes become too much of a distraction. You’ve got to make sure you aren’t overextending yourself on all the surplus parts of this job to the point where you don’t have time to actually write. Or live your life. It’s really easy to burn out if you get overloaded, so make sure you are taking time for yourself and getting out in the real world to actually live, away from the keyboard ;-)

If  you had the chance to change something regarding how you got published,  what  would you change?

I don’t think I’d change anything. Yes, it would have been incredibly fun to get a huge publishing contract on my first book with less than 10 rejections. But I think having a harder road to success has made me appreciate it all that much more. I spent a lot of very frustrated years writing and querying and getting ohsoclose and then getting rejection upon rejection. But all those years gave me a tough skin, more patience than I thought it would be possible for me to possess, and a greater understanding of how to actually do my job. Not going to lie, there were a lot of years of sweat, tears, and even a little blood (and still are) but every moment of the crazy roller coaster that is this business has helped me learn a valuable lesson and/or helped to make me a better writer.

Did you credit any person or organization with helping you get published?

Too many people to name :-) My husband for sure. Without his help, my life would be a lot more difficult. My mom and sister who are my biggest cheerleaders and love everything I write :-) Everyone needs a good cheerleader or two. And my group of close knit friends, who are not only my support group but also an amazingly talented group of writers who both lift my spirits, encourage me when I need it, shred my manuscripts to pieces and then help put them back together again, often over and over again, and without whom I’d be certifiably insane.

What’s the best advice you can give to aspiring authors?

WRITE! No matter what else is going on in your life or publishing journey, find the time to write. Practice will never make perfect (because there is no such thing) but practice does make publishable ;-)

ABOUT MICHELLE MCLEAN

Romance and non-fiction author Michelle McLean is a jeans and t-shirt kind of girl who is addicted to chocolate and Goldfish crackers and spent most of her formative years with her nose in a book. She has a B.S. in History, a M.A. in English, and loves her romance with a hearty side of suspenseful mystery.
When Michelle’s not editing, reading or chasing her kids around, she can usually be found in a quiet corner working on her next book. She resides in PA with her husband and two children, an insanely hyper dog, and three very spoiled cats.

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Michelle is giving away a $25 Amazon/B&N Gift Card!

Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • 1 winner will be chosen via Rafflecopter to receive each of the prizes
  • This giveaway begins June 9 and ends on June 20.
  • Winners will be contacted via email on June 21, 2014.
  • Winner has 48 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

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Book Excerpt: Semi-Coma: Evolution of My Intermittent Consciousness by Gulten Dye

Title: Semi-Coma: Evolution of My Intermittent Consciousness
Author: Gulten Dye
Publisher: Gulten Dye Publishing Company
Pages: 205
Language: English
Genre: Self-Help
Format: Paperback & eBook

Purchase at AMAZON

This book is about self-discovery and the journey that awakened me to the many facets of life. The road hasn’t always been easy with its tolls and junctions. It’s about my struggle to discover who I really am, what I believe in and how I’ve arrived at a place where I am able to appreciate myself and my surroundings.

Most of my life I lived in a state of arrested consciousness without being aware of it. Then one day out of nowhere my eyes opened just enough for me to question my way of living and my state of mind. That was the day questions started to arrive. They were nothing like the questions I had before. As if they weren’t even questions they were an unraveling string of realizations followed by overwhelming sorrow. How could I have lived my life as if I was in a semi coma and in turn induce my own suffering?

Of course in the beginning of seeing I didn’t realize that my eyes would open slightly from time to time to give me an illusion of happiness, but because I had no idea what true happiness was I would drift back to my state of familiarity. I lived my life mostly on an automatic life-sustaining machine by my body without my mind interfering with it.

It is my hope that the stories I share with you will somehow touch your heart, perhaps crack open a door and shine a light for you to embark on your own quest of self-discovery. I don’t presume to have all the answers; I don’t even know all the questions. At the very least, I am seeking to understand and allow life to happen; learning to take responsibility and ownership of myself and my actions, and appreciating all that is.

Read the chapters, each on its own. As you move through them, you will uncover my intermittent consciousness as I explore my thoughts or beliefs and might be able to even get a glimpse of my evolution along the way.

I am blessed to have had so many people touch my life and, knowingly or unknowingly, helped me on my journey. I have come to realize that because we are all one, that anything I come to know and am willing to share with others affects all of us in a positive way. With great humility, I open up my imperfect, yet perfect, life for you to walk beside me. I am forever grateful and honored.

Book Excerpt:

Clinical rotations started during the second year in nursing school. As you can imagine, after being in school for a year and not even seeing the inside of the hospital other than the morgue, was boring and seemed like a waste of time for a nursing student who chose her profession to be around the patients. Who needs microbiology when you can be in the middle of the action, in the hospital with patients?

Although we had a few boys in our lab technician division, our mostly female boarding school was kind of exciting, especially when we lined up in front of the school bus in our uniforms to go to the hospital. There were thirty-five girls, who were divided into groups of seven in my class. One of the criteria for graduation was that we all had to rotate to every clinic in the hospital over a three-year span.

Nursing student uniforms are definitely different than the all so exotic nurses’ uniforms. Our pale blue, cotton, short sleeved, tent-like dress buttoned all the way up to our chin. We always had to wear white stockings, white shoes and a white cap. We had to put our hair in a bun under our cap and were not allowed to have long nails, make-up or any jewelry.

In the winter, we wore a long, dark blue cape to stay warm. All in all, I think that our uniforms were designed on purpose to make even the most beautiful girl unattractive. But no matter what we were wearing, we all thought we were all that at the time.

First rotations consisted of behind-the-scene things like, diagnostic and research labs, allergy and immunization clinics, and home health. One of my personal favorites was home health. That was when one of our teachers would take us to visit families in mostly lower income neighborhoods. We would teach them about birth control, childcare and the importance of having regular check-ups.

Since they knew of our visit, it was customary in Turkey to “force feed” anyone who dared to pass by your home, and we were always fed delicious food. Our visits were always in the afternoon, and like the English, we love our hot tea, pastries, tea biscuits and cookies.  It was these that we were mostly served. At times, someone would really go out of their way and feed us traditional foods, which were heavenly.

Even with all the food I loved eating, I didn’t want to teach home health. I grew up doing most of that with my mother. She was a midwife nurse, and besides delivering babies, one of her many job descriptions was to teach home health, and I often tagged along with her. My job as a child was to help Mom do all that.

I wanted to go to the hospital where the patients were, or so I thought at the time, anyway. But, then again, those rotations which lasted 3 months were still much more exciting than being stuck in a classroom all day long.

Besides being in the huge university hospital, no matter what clinic we had to go to was beyond anything I had known up to this point. Each clinic was like a small city unto itself, housing several buildings, each several stories high.

There wasn’t a day that went by that I personally didn’t experience or live drama through the stories of other students. Each night after mandatory study sessions, we would gather on our beds and share mind-blowing stories until our mandated bedtime.

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Book Spotlight: Evolution of My Intermittent Consciousness by Gulten Dye

Title: Semi-Coma: Evolution of My Intermittent Consciousness
Author: Gulten Dye
Publisher: Gulten Dye Publishing Company
Pages: 205
Language: English
Genre: Self-Help
Format: Paperback & eBook

Purchase at AMAZON

This book is about self-discovery and the journey that awakened me to the many facets of life. The road hasn’t always been easy with its tolls and junctions. It’s about my struggle to discover who I really am, what I believe in and how I’ve arrived at a place where I am able to appreciate myself and my surroundings.

Most of my life I lived in a state of arrested consciousness without being aware of it. Then one day out of nowhere my eyes opened just enough for me to question my way of living and my state of mind. That was the day questions started to arrive. They were nothing like the questions I had before. As if they weren’t even questions they were an unraveling string of realizations followed by overwhelming sorrow. How could I have lived my life as if I was in a semi coma and in turn induce my own suffering?

Of course in the beginning of seeing I didn’t realize that my eyes would open slightly from time to time to give me an illusion of happiness, but because I had no idea what true happiness was I would drift back to my state of familiarity. I lived my life mostly on an automatic life-sustaining machine by my body without my mind interfering with it.

It is my hope that the stories I share with you will somehow touch your heart, perhaps crack open a door and shine a light for you to embark on your own quest of self-discovery. I don’t presume to have all the answers; I don’t even know all the questions. At the very least, I am seeking to understand and allow life to happen; learning to take responsibility and ownership of myself and my actions, and appreciating all that is.

Read the chapters, each on its own. As you move through them, you will uncover my intermittent consciousness as I explore my thoughts or beliefs and might be able to even get a glimpse of my evolution along the way.

I am blessed to have had so many people touch my life and, knowingly or unknowingly, helped me on my journey. I have come to realize that because we are all one, that anything I come to know and am willing to share with others affects all of us in a positive way. With great humility, I open up my imperfect, yet perfect, life for you to walk beside me. I am forever grateful and honored.

First Chapter:

Clinical rotations started during the second year in nursing school. As you can imagine, after being in school for a year and not even seeing the inside of the hospital other than the morgue, was boring and seemed like a waste of time for a nursing student who chose her profession to be around the patients. Who needs microbiology when you can be in the middle of the action, in the hospital with patients?

Although we had a few boys in our lab technician division, our mostly female boarding school was kind of exciting, especially when we lined up in front of the school bus in our uniforms to go to the hospital. There were thirty-five girls, who were divided into groups of seven in my class. One of the criteria for graduation was that we all had to rotate to every clinic in the hospital over a three-year span.

Nursing student uniforms are definitely different than the all so exotic nurses’ uniforms. Our pale blue, cotton, short sleeved, tent-like dress buttoned all the way up to our chin. We always had to wear white stockings, white shoes and a white cap. We had to put our hair in a bun under our cap and were not allowed to have long nails, make-up or any jewelry.

In the winter, we wore a long, dark blue cape to stay warm. All in all, I think that our uniforms were designed on purpose to make even the most beautiful girl unattractive. But no matter what we were wearing, we all thought we were all that at the time.

First rotations consisted of behind-the-scene things like, diagnostic and research labs, allergy and immunization clinics, and home health. One of my personal favorites was home health. That was when one of our teachers would take us to visit families in mostly lower income neighborhoods. We would teach them about birth control, childcare and the importance of having regular check-ups.

Since they knew of our visit, it was customary in Turkey to “force feed” anyone who dared to pass by your home, and we were always fed delicious food. Our visits were always in the afternoon, and like the English, we love our hot tea, pastries, tea biscuits and cookies. It was these that we were mostly served. At times, someone would really go out of their way and feed us traditional foods, which were heavenly.

Even with all the food I loved eating, I didn’t want to teach home health. I grew up doing most of that with my mother. She was a midwife nurse, and besides delivering babies, one of her many job descriptions was to teach home health, and I often tagged along with her. My job as a child was to help Mom do all that.

I wanted to go to the hospital where the patients were, or so I thought at the time, anyway. But, then again, those rotations which lasted 3 months were still much more exciting than being stuck in a classroom all day long.

Besides being in the huge university hospital, no matter what clinic we had to go to was beyond anything I had known up to this point. Each clinic was like a small city unto itself, housing several buildings, each several stories high.

There wasn’t a day that went by that I personally didn’t experience or live drama through the stories of other students. Each night after mandatory study sessions, we would gather on our beds and share mind-blowing stories until our mandated bedtime.

Although it did not become clear to me until years later, there was no emotional attachment to the labs, morgues or in teaching home health. Personally, as long as I didn’t come into contact with a patient in human form, it was easier for me to deal with anything that had to do with paperwork.

It felt somewhat unreal to find cancer cells with a microscope in someone’s blood in a lab and then be the one to document on a piece of paper their unfortunate fate. It was as if it were a game, not reality. But it was quite different to hear the news of someone you only met once that he has cancer. No matter how interesting it was to be in the lab and to search for diseased cells, it still wasn’t my cup of tea.

As the rotations continued, I remember moments that had rendered me speechless. One such moment was when I saw a dead body for the first time. It was shocking! It was even more shocking to cut with a blade on a dead body, all in the name of science.

When a patient I got to know passed away, I felt deep grief. Early on, I somewhat understood that getting to know the patients wasn’t a brilliant idea. I don’t think anyone intentionally wanted us to learn any life lessons; rather, overall, going to the clinics was designed to make us mechanical caretakers of the body, and its needs.

But you would have to be dead inside not to be affected by what goes on in human lives in and around the hospitals. I stared straight into the fearful eyes of people who were in intense pain…people who looked at me, deep into my eyes, with a need for compassion. Some even reached to grab my hand to ask for mercy to stop their pain and misery. At the time of its happening, I didn’t pay attention to my real emotions or the attached lessons since I was pretending to be very strong. They surfaced years later.

But, let’s get real! Of course, we were all affected from such a dramatic work place! After those rotations, often a student would drop out of school since it was hard for most to handle such things on a daily basis. Unlike most work places, mine was full of saintly lessons if your heart was wide open. In hospitals, humans are most vulnerable. They willingly or unwillingly must let their guards down, and they have to trust and depend on total strangers. It is very humbling, to say the least. Usually in such a place, ego has to go into its dormant state and, in my opinion, where it should remain for eternity.

In a hospital, human drama in every stage is out in the open for all to witness. Often, after we or someone we know gets critically ill or is dying, we crumble. As students, we crumbled along with the patients and their families to almost the same small pieces under the heavy burden. Witnessing and being a part of human suffering on a daily basis has its difficulties, especially when you are very young. In such an environment, you don’t get to take your time to grow up. You sort of grow up over night.

Not all things that make you grow up in a hospital are considered suffering. In the beginning, there are mostly times of hardship where you get to learn your lesson often under very rough circumstances. Though your fate is being tested on an hourly basis, if you allow it, this is a place you can become saintly after many tears, heartaches and lessons. Even if your heart is too small, you are sort of forced by nature to become more compassionate in your caring for others.

At the end of our required four-year education, which at the time felt like a long, dreaded winter, we completed our metamorphosis beyond any shadow of a doubt, but without the few students who had to drop out. We emerged as beautiful butterflies.

I know and acknowledge the need and the importance of a nurse in human existence. Beyond the ideal glory job, I don’t think there is much glory in nursing. Like anyone else who has had hands-on job training around the critically ill, no one can ever claim they didn’t cry at one time or another.

I remember questioning the existence of God through tears after witnessing the death of a young child with leukemia in the Pediatric Oncology unit. I remember feeling overwhelming sorrow, while watching a person shrivel right before my eyes, after hearing the news of losing a loved one in the emergency room. I remember being crazy afraid to forget to give someone their pain pill and cause them further suffering.

There were a few occasions when the fear I felt was not for someone else, but was for me. Like the time when my teacher locked the door behind me, right after I had entered the male lock-down psychiatric unit. For years, I couldn’t shake off the feeling of being dragged through the long hallways.

In reality, what had happened as soon as she locked the door behind me, a chain-smoking, smelly, male patient grabbed me by my arm and made me walk with him what seemed like an eternity until one of the unit nurses came to my rescue. It’s not that she really cared to rescue me because it wasn’t a secret among students those days in Turkey that while most nurses sat behind their desk and chain-smoked, we had to do all their chores. And believe it or not, in 1987, I even remember smoking in the lounge of a surgery center where I worked in Shreveport, Louisiana. Wow! Imagine that! Thank God, times have changed!

Sometimes, though not nearly enough, there were divine moments where your faith was restored and reminded you of the other side of the coin. Like the times I, along with other students, breathed in and out for long periods and began puffing with the women who were in labor, bringing new life into this world; or when I was the one delivering the news after just learning that after a long, fierce battle that someone was cancer-free, and together through tears of joy, we shared a life-affirming moment.

Although I remember some of those feelings and recall them as my memories, they are now mostly faded like background noise, and only occasionally occupy my mind.

But there is one memory of a moment still as fresh as the day of its happening. In my third year of nursing school, we were given more and more responsibilities, such as working in places like the Burn Care Units, Intensive Care Units and the operating rooms. By this time, I was becoming a cockier, seasoned pro and I knew it. However, it soon became apparent how little I knew. I never will forget the moment when I carelessly walked into one of the rooms in the step- down Intensive Care Unit. I literally felt all my blood draining, rushing out of my body. I froze at the sight of a patient who was in a semi-coma.

There was a young girl in a hospital bed, her body propped up with the help of several pillows. Her head had slipped to its side and was now tilted at an angle. It almost looked as if she were looking down, but had lifted her head halfway to look at you without straightening her body. Her eyes were unnaturally open. After my initial shock wore off, I noticed a large ventilator with a thick, white tube going from the machine to an opening in her neck.

I later learned that she was in her early twenties and had slipped into a coma seven years earlier due to a brutal car accident. She now was in a semi coma, her life being sustained with the help of the external ventilator. For me, the most haunting thing was her eyes.Her eyelids had atrophied due to years of not using them, leaving her eyes exposed. Although her eyes were open, they were empty like someone had sucked the life right out of them, but forgot to do the same thing to her body. She was alive, but without the presence of emotions. There appeared to be no signs of life in her.

After the first day, I somehow got used to her just lying there. Each day, we would care for her with the help of her devoted family. It was like taking care of an infant, but because her body was much larger, it made it harder for us to handle her. It usually took two of us to care for her needs. Besides the usual need to change her diaper, give her a bed bath, comb her hair and brush her teeth, there were added things, like cleaning the tracheotomy site, suctioning her airway, and nourishing her with a feeding tube.

Since her circulation was diminished, we would have to reposition her to prevent bedsores, which were deadly for anyone in her condition. When we turned her and tried to exercise her limbs, she would moan an almost invisible moan. At times, while I massaged her frail body with talc powder, I would think to myself, “Why bother, as if after all these years later, she will wake up and have a life that is worth living?” In my mind, I was thinking since she was not conscious of what was going on around her and could not control her bodily functions, she would not experience feelings nor would she have the ability to interact, experience awareness or make the choice that her life was not worth living.

After I spent two days a week with this girl for several months, I went into her room one day and found the bed empty.

“She must have passed away,” I thought. As I inched my way to the usual hustle of the busy nurse’s station, I was surprised at my conflicting emotions. On one hand, I felt the same emptiness inside of me as I did after the passing of each patient I had come to know. On the other hand, I was happy for her. Her suffering finally had come to an end. Afraid of looking weak, I didn’t want to ask if she had died.

But soon I could not overcome my curiosity as I heard myself asking in a small voice, “Did she die?”

“No,” said one of the nurses. “She went home!”

“She went home?” I repeated back, without being able to hide my shock.

“Yes, she went home.” repeated the nurse before handing me a list of things that had to be done that morning.

Apparently, one day, out of nowhere, she had regained her consciousness. Did that mean that she could now breathe on her own, and have voluntary movements? Did that mean she could now see when she looked? Did that mean she is now like the rest of us in a semi-coma in consciousness only? Her brain might be back to do its job and to take care and help sustain her body, but her state of mind will remain in the state of Intermittent Consciousness.

To tell you the truth, at the time, I was not awake enough to have noticed such thoughts. Not until years later did I have enough clarity to question what it means to wake up after seven years of being in a coma.

From that shocking moment up until now, many years have passed. Along the way, I experienced rare moments of pure joy, as if I could zoom in and see myself and everything around me with such clarity, in great detail. In those rare moments, I felt intense aliveness. I often felt like I could fly! It was as if I were a butterfly, who landed on each and every flower petal to take a closer look. I could smell scents I didn’t even know existed. I not only saw the colors of things, but the depth of the colors themselves. In those fleeting moments, I felt utter contentment, peace and happiness. I didn’t know to question where these feelings of bliss came from or if I had the power to make it happen more often. In my innocent ignorance, I attributed those moments of random happiness to external conditions outside of me because they usually happened during long, intimate moments, while dancing, or after a super long walk in the wilderness.

I thought that the other person or the condition was the cause of my happiness. So when I felt that way, I believed that I was in love with that person and wanted him to give me more of those moments. As for dancing, I went every weekend and danced for four or five hours nonstop. I didn’t understand that when I experienced those moments of joy, even if only for a split second, my overloaded brain stopped thinking and went into a meditative state where all mental chatter ceased. It was only then that I became aware of all the beauty around me. Since I had not heard about Wayne Dyer, Deepak Chopra, or Eckhart Tolle at the time, I went on living my life on an automatic invisible life sustaining machine, wishing for more of those moments.

It took years of mental suffering before I learned the simple truth about living in the present moment. I seldom had moments of clarity. Conscious presence was a rare occurrence for me. Even when I had moments of clarity, I wasn’t aware of them until years later. It would take me years to get to this point of feeling alive and being able to zoom into my inner self, as well as the inner self of all those other beings around me.

There is a real joy of knowing the way to true happiness that doesn’t depend on outer conditions.

Perhaps you will find the story of my Intermittent Consciousness and my search for enlightenment resonate with you, or better yet, start to awaken something within you.

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Interview with Richard Williams, author of The Disappearance of Jessie Hunter


ABOUT THE DISAPPEARANCE OF JESSIE HUNTER


9781475999365_COVER_FQA.inddTitle:
The Disappearance of Jessie Hunter
Genre: Mystery/Suspense
Author: Richard Williams
Publisher: iUniverse
Pages: 174
Language: English
ISBN – 978-1-47599-936-5

Jessie Hunter is spoiled and always has been. He is in college when his father unexpectedly dies, and he must return home to sort out the family funds. Jessie expects to become lord of the manor, taking over his father’s business and land and becoming the high-powered man his father always wanted him to be. But nothing is as it appears to be.

Jessie soon comes to suspect that his father was murdered and that whoever killed his father now wants Jessie dead as well. He can’t be sure why, but he knows he’s being hunted and must go on the run. Jessie must place his trust in an estranged uncle he never knew in order to stay alive.

Now in hiding, Jessie leans on others to find safety and answers. But how will this spoiled, sheltered young man be able to solve the mystery of his father’s death? In order to get his life back, Jessie must be strong or end up dead at the hands of his father’s assassin.

Purchase your copy:

iuniverseWhat was the hardest part about writing your book?

Finding the time to write. I work, so I have to steal the time to write, which is why I write late at night many times.

Do you have a favorite excerpt from the book? If so, can you share it?

Wow, there are several in fact. But the one I think I like the most is when Jessie is leaving his uncle behind and going to where he is going to have to live in order to hide from those who are looking for him. “You taught me so much Chris, but you didn’t teach me how to say goodbye.” Jessie stood there with tears flowing down his face now. Chris stood up and stepped toward Jessie. “That’s because String, we don’t ever say goodbye, just so long until we see you again.” His new name…, He knew Jessie Hunter was gone for good. Stringfellow Horan was who he was now.

What do you hope readers will take away after reading the book?

That they can do more with their life than they have ever dreamed. It’s never too late to see one’s dreams come true.

Who or what is the inspiration for the book?

Really no one is the inspiration behind the book as far as it being a real person. It was just a thought that came to me one day and I just kept running it through my mind until I came up with a story line that I liked

Have you a mentor? If so, can you talk about them a little?

No, not really when it comes to writing. I have authors, whose writings have inspired me though.

I have heard it said in order to be a good writer, you have to be a reader as well? Do you find this to be true? And if you are a reader, do you have a favorite genre and or author?

It would be difficult for me to pick one genre over another. I like thrillers, mysteries. My favorite author would have to be C. S. Lewis.


ABOUT RICHARD WILLIAMS

Richard Williams is also the author of the Guardians series. He and his wife, Janice, have two children and two grandchildren. They currently live in Mississippi with their two shelties.

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Interview with Dr. C, author of Shopping for a Lighter Cross

ABOUT SHOPPING FOR A LIGHTER CROSS


9781475996821_COVER_FQA.indd

Title: Shopping for a Lighter Cross

Genre: Biography

Author: Dr. C

Publisher: iUniverse

Pages: 64

Language: English

ISBN – 978-1-47599-682-1
Everyone has life’s challenges and can face them with fear or with trust. I choose to look at them as experiences where God blessed me with His curve balls thrown in. These curve balls are not the negative, painful or abusive life experiences that I have lived through, but rather the unexpected, blessings, gifts, and graces God threw in to help me through the experiences. I believe that these curve balls were given so that I can witness to His great and awesome presence in and through the experiences, the people in those experiences and in myself as living through and surviving the experiences as a better, not bitter human being.

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iuniverse

What was the hardest part about writing your book?

Recalling the negative and painful experiences that I lived through and grieving the loss of my parents and our relationship because of the experiences.

Do you have a favorite excerpt from the book? If so, can you share it?

“As a victim, I stand firm in a few things: I will never be defeated or be a quitter. I will never allow anyone to gain control of my heart, body, mind, or spirit again. I will always strive to see God in all people because I know that we are all created in His image—no matter what choices we make. I have been blessed with so much. I will always remember to say thank you to God.

If this book helps or inspires at least one other person to become whole, healed, and healthy again, it will be a success. God has called me to share my story; may he bless those who read it to see His hand in the writing.” Final chapter, last paragraph

What do you hope readers will take away after reading the book?

A greater sense of being loved, and cared for by God and others. A sense of belief that they are not alone no matter how bad things are. That they are stronger than they believe and that they will continue to get through whatever comes their way, they have to believe. That healing and wholeness is theirs, it isn’t easy, but it is what is best for them and once they experience it, they will see that their pain was not in vain. That the author loves her faith and truly has experienced the presence, love and mercy of God through the horror experienced in her childhood and the healing that she has experienced in her adulthood. She wants to spread that good news so that someone else can share in that joyful experience.

Who or what is the inspiration for the book?

Father John, my husband and friends were my inspiration. It was my sense of wholeness and healing that I wanted to share with others who are suffering.

Have you had a mentor? If so, can you talk about them a little?

I did not have a mentor with regards to writing. My life- long Father figure has been Father John and he has always encouraged me, guided me and supported me in all of my endeavors.

I have heard it said in order to be a good writer, you have to be a reader as well? Do you find this to be true? And if you are a reader, do you have a favorite genre and/or author?

I agree. My favorite genres are devotional, faith based, history, and humor.

Henri Nouwen, Anthony DeMello and Erma Bombeck.


ABOUT DR. C

The author lives in Aston, Pennsylvania with her husband John, their golden retriever Clover and their two cats: Duchess and Graygray. Dr. C is a Pastoral Associate/Spiritual Director for a Catholic parish in Delaware County and John works for the Federal Government. Dr. C graduated with her Doctorate in Ministry degree in May 2013.

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Interview with Katherine Perreth, author of Making Lemonade with Ben – Win a Kindle Paperwhite!


Making Lemonade with Ben

With deftly wielded humor and heart-wrenching candor, Katherine Perreth vividly recounts the myriad physical, mental, emotional and spiritual repercussions stemming from her son’s massive brain hemorrhage. Seven-year-old Ben suffers numerous disabilities and, later, mental health challenges. Yet, love wins.

Making Lemonade With Ben is a compelling Cinderella story tracing sixteen years of Ben’s life. It begins with the night a University of Wisconsin Hospital neurosurgeon saved Ben, and follows Ben through young adulthood. Although he encounters years of substantial obstacles, in 2011 his never-say-die cheery attitude and uber-outgoing ways ultimately carry him to Washington D.C. There he represents the Madison Children’s Museum, his employer, at a national award ceremony. Wearing his ankle-foot-orthosis with a smiley face on the back, Ben juggles one-handed everywhere he goes, accomplishing his life goal: “Make humanity smile.”

Universal themes of perseverance and compassion encourage readers to contemplate contemporary issues: mental illness treatment, recovery and stigma, the role of intentional employers in the lives of those with disabilities, and the success that can occur when a community values all of her citizens.

Purchase your copy:

amazon

Could you please tell us a little about your book?

Making Lemonade With Ben: The Audacity to Cope (MLWB) alternates between two timelines: 1996-2010, Ben’s traumatic yet often hilarious childhood, and the fall of 2011 when he was hired by a children’s museum as a one-handed juggler, and sent to Washington DC to collect a national award.

At heart, MLWB is a love story with multiple threads: mother-child, husband-wife, mother-daughter, supportive communities-suffering family, nurturing women-hurting woman. The book includes bits and bobs from our three years living in Japan and a cameo appearance by Johnny Depp. (When Johnny hugs you at 4:00 in the morning, you know you have a story.) Wrapping up my life’s loose ends in what I’ve come to call Life With Ben, I found the completion of MLWB extremely gratifying. Just like finishing laundry.

Some folks misread the title, and thus believe the book to be about hope. For me, MLWB is about what happens after hope has evaporated, poof! What do you do then?

The book starts emotionally rough, with Ben in a coma. However, the structure provides sweet breathers – I organized MLWB the way I’ve learned to live, with joy, laughter and humor in the midst of pain.

MLWB inhales my brand of quirky and exhales heartache. While I’m dead serious on some subjects in the book, notably my suicidal tendencies, depression, psychotherapy and how we can better support our struggling citizens, you’d be hard pressed to read too long without finding humor. After all, it has been high on my family’s list of coping strategies. I also feel that humor makes us stop and think.

2. Who or what is the inspiration behind this book?

Ben. And women asked for his story, and mine. Many people followed Ben’s recovery for years after his initial emergency craniotomy. When I would email updates, women invariably responded, “I hope you’re going to put this in your book!”

I thought they were crazy. For well over a decade, I dwelled simply in familial and personal survival – albeit, sometimes it was non-functional survival.

3. Who is your biggest supporter?

My family. I gave my kids the three censorship options: Trust me, I’m your mother, read the entire manuscript, or read only the sections in which you feature. Ben read it all and offered insights, commentary, and clarifications, making MLWB so much richer. (In fact, three of his essays are included and I gave him the last word.) My other two kids chose to read only their appearances, and approved them all – I threatened to stop cooking nightly dinners if they didn’t.

My husband read it repeatedly, adding his voice while encouraging me to keep mine. Whenever I wanted to yank this section or that, because I felt too vulnerable, he talked me out of it every time. I took his advice except for the chapter entitled “A Woman Is A Woman.” He asked if I could at least blow up some shoes. Ain’t gonna happen.

Ben, now 25, has been incredibly supportive post-publication, offering his critique of the book that bears his name, “Flawless sprinkled with awesomeness!” (Need I mention this is my favorite review?)

4. What cause are you most passionate about and why?

Removing stigma from mental illness. The sooner we all understand that mental illness is just like physical illness, the better for everyone. Mental illness is nothing new, nothing to be ashamed about, is a global concern, and can be a killer – just like physical illness. Even if we can’t be “fixed,” the choices we make can either alleviate or exacerbate our illnesses – physical and mental. There is a measure of empowerment in that.

And powerful good can happen when a community values all of her citizens through intentional employers and proper mental illness treatment and support. Ben’s life bears witness to that.

I believe the Clubhouse Model of mental illness treatment, support and recovery is critical. For more information, visit http://www.iccd.org

5. Are you a different person now than you were 5 years ago? In what way/s?

Most important, writing MLWB produced the unexpected consequence of having my heart put back together, something I didn’t think was possible. People often muse that writing the book must have been cathartic. Actually, all the writing I did for years before beginning MLWB was cathartic. Telling the story, organizing the writing, weaving in humor and my Creative Cathartic Vignettes, putting all that together into one hefty rectangle, was more than cathartic. It was healing. I often say MLWB is my heart and soul in 3D – it may be a broken heart, but it has been soldered.

And if you’d like to know why I chose to offer it to the general public, it’s because I have a social work degree from the UW-Madison, but even more important, I have a social work heart. (There’s part of the backstory of MLWB for you – for free! Don’t you love free things?)

6. What do you feel has been your greatest achievement as an author?

When a woman hung an Olympic-like medallion around my neck at an award ceremony last November, I felt like I had successfully reinvented myself. Receiving “Non-fiction: Inspirational” kudos in Miami was split-second surreal.

However, readers contacting me to thank me for my honesty in writing MLWB, definitely trumps the medal. I have struck a chord with many who either suffer themselves or love someone struggling with mental illness, raising a special needs child, and/or living with chronic disability.

People tell me they have found my words helpful in either better explaining themselves to family and friends, or better understanding someone else. Really, how can you best help someone you love if you don’t understand the situation?

Women especially find the topics raised in MLWB pertinent and conducive to book club discussions. (Hey, women! I’m counting on your talking amongst yourselves leading to change in society.)

7. What do you feel is your biggest strength?

My big mouth and willingness to be vulnerable. Decades ago in college, my best friend said, “Kath, you’re willing to say what other people only think.” She meant that as a compliment, finding my self-deprecating witty candor refreshing.

8. Biggest weakness?

My big mouth and willingness to be vulnerable. ’Nuff said.

(This is a good example of the double-edged swords I talk about in MLWB.)

9. What do you feel sets this book apart from others in the same genre?

Ben. Ben embodies Yeats’ sentiment, “There are no strangers here, only friends you haven’t yet met.” Ben’s uber-outgoing ways, cheerfully charming disposition, and never-say-die attitude endear him to nearly everyone he meets. Who wouldn’t love a one-handed juggler sporting a smiley-face on the back of his ankle-foot orthosis?

Yet, although MLWB chronicles Ben’s life, and is an amateur psychological study on my kids, husband and marriage, it’s also a candid look at Ben’s mom. The physical, mental, emotional and spiritual impact Ben’s life has had on me, and how I’ve managed to survive, oftentimes despite myself. In MLWB I’ve done such a marvelous job accurately portraying myself that sometimes I feel as if I were Lady Godiva, minus the hair.

10. In the last year have you learned or improved on any skills?

Not to say learned, but I have improved my technological abilities a little – I now can text emoticons.

My brain has been on a pretty steep learning curve, finding there are entirely too many options to click, share, link, follow, tag, like, hiccup. It’s pretty safe to say that if it has more than two buttons, and it isn’t a blouse, I’m going to have trouble with it. Real and virtual.

However, speaking to live audiences is a delight. When over 100 people rose to their feet at the conclusion of our National Alliance on Mental Illness keynote speech in March 2014, there were only two things to do: let my mascara run and my heart shoot fireworks of gratitude. (Ben also juggled lemons on stage, which had a great deal to do with that standing O, I’m thinkin’. You simply cannot stop Ben from communicating with humanity, pursuing his goal to make everyone smile.)

11. Do you have any rituals you follow when finishing a piece of work?

Well, the day MLWB was published I donned my Golden Lame Wonder Woman outfit and danced wildly in my living room while my husband spun the discs. Does that count?

12. What are some of your long term goals?

Tea with Queen Elizabeth at her annual Garden Party. Until then, I’ll just be taking tea in my own backyard with my husband.

13. Is there anything else you would like to share with us?

As a journalist, I love a story. But I really love a backstory – the how and why of the thing. Recently, I’ve been speechwriting. My standard speech details the bewildering, slightly OCD, creation of MLWB.

When I write, whether my book, speeches, or feature articles, I must be entertained. I’ve learned if I’m entertained, others are. There has got to be honesty, as well. I’m going to tell it like it is, and hopefully you’ll die laughing.

Or crying. Obviously, there’s much sorrow and pain in life, no laughing matter. Ben’s life underscores that. But if I can inject black humor into my dismal situation, that also aids in expressing troubling emotions. At least I’ve found that to be true. I say I’m an equal opportunity employer when it comes to humor: white, gray and black, I’ll use ’em all to survive.

In writing MLWB, I aimed for real – it proved quite the balancing act. I did not want to be either whiny or Pollyannaish.

(You can be the judge on whether or not I succeeded.)

Thanks for taking the time to read this and for your support!

About Katherine Perreth


Katherine holds UW-Madison Social Work and Sociology degrees, is a reporter for her hometown newspaper, the Middleton Times Tribune, and conducts a class on reminiscence writing. In addition, in her role as administrative staff with WESLI (an ESL school on Madison’s capitol square), she deals in chalk. And paper. Oodles of paper. She recently took an EmptyNester Victory Tour with her husband of 28 years, but hasn’t yet changed the locks on their home. Their three kids can still get in.

Her latest books is Making Lemonade with Ben: The Audacity to Cope

Drop by to pay her visit at: www.katherineperreth.com.

Facebook * Goodreads

Katherine is giving away a Kindle Paperwhite!

Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • This giveaway begins April 21  and ends on June 27, 2014.
  • Winners will be contacted via email by July 2, 2014.
  • Winner has 72 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Making Lemonade with Ben: The Audacity to Cope by Katherine Perreth Book Feature – Win a Kindle Paperwhite!

Making Lemonade with BenWith deftly wielded humor and heart-wrenching candor, Katherine Perreth vividly recounts the myriad physical, mental, emotional and spiritual repercussions stemming from her son’s massive brain hemorrhage. Seven-year-old Ben suffers numerous disabilities and, later, mental health challenges. Yet, love wins.

Making Lemonade With Ben is a compelling Cinderella story tracing sixteen years of Ben’s life. It begins with the night a University of Wisconsin Hospital neurosurgeon saved Ben, and follows Ben through young adulthood. Although he encounters years of substantial obstacles, in 2011 his never-say-die cheery attitude and uber-outgoing ways ultimately carry him to Washington D.C. There he represents the Madison Children’s Museum, his employer, at a national award ceremony. Wearing his ankle-foot-orthosis with a smiley face on the back, Ben juggles one-handed everywhere he goes, accomplishing his life goal: “Make humanity smile.”

Universal themes of perseverance and compassion encourage readers to contemplate contemporary issues: mental illness treatment, recovery and stigma, the role of intentional employers in the lives of those with disabilities, and the success that can occur when a community values all of her citizens.

Purchase your copy:

amazon

Discuss all these books in our PUYB Virtual Book Club at Goodreads by clicking HERE


Katherine holds UW-Madison Social Work and Sociology degrees, is a reporter for her hometown newspaper, the Middleton Times Tribune, and conducts a class on reminiscence writing. In addition, in her role as administrative staff with WESLI (an ESL school on Madison’s capitol square), she deals in chalk. And paper. Oodles of paper. She recently took an EmptyNester Victory Tour with her husband of 28 years, but hasn’t yet changed the locks on their home. Their three kids can still get in.

Her latest books is Making Lemonade with Ben: The Audacity to Cope

Drop by to pay her visit at: www.katherineperreth.com.

Facebook * Goodreads

Katherine is giving away a Kindle Paperwhite!

Terms & Conditions:
  • By entering the giveaway, you are confirming you are at least 18 years old.
  • This giveaway begins April 21  and ends on June 27, 2014.
  • Winners will be contacted via email by July 2, 2014.
  • Winner has 72 hours to reply.

Good luck everyone!

ENTER TO WIN!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

  • Share/Bookmark

Authors Secret Weapon: Street Teams

#MFRWorg Authors Secret Weapon: Street Teams (via MFRW Marketing)

Author Street Teams. Likely, you’ve heard this term before. They’re popping up all over the place as authors take advantage of their most valuable resource – their readers. Readers -especially bloggers/ reviewers- are vital to a book’s success because…

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