Tuesday Tidbits: Harper Studio, Margaret Atwood & Paperback Novels

Harper Studio to close

HarperStudio, the forward-thinking imprint at HarperCollins, will close. It was announced today that it will release its final books this summer and its remaining staff will be absorbed by other imprints at Harper Collins, reports Publishers Marketplace[registration required]. Publisher Bob Miller  announced March 17 that he’d be departing for Workman Publishing; with no clear successor named, HarperStudio seemed headed toward limbo.

Read rest of article in the LA Times

Margaret Atwood on Twitter

A long time ago—less than a year ago in fact, but time goes all stretchy in the Twittersphere, just as it does in those folksongs in which the hero spends a night with the Queen of Faerie and then returns to find that a hundred years have passed and all his friends are dead…. Where was I?

Read rest of article in the New York Review of Books

How the Paperback Novel Changed Popular Literature

The story about the first Penguin paperbacks may be apocryphal, but it is a good one. In 1935, Allen Lane, chairman of the eminent British publishing house Bodley Head, spent a weekend in the country with Agatha Christie. Bodley Head, like many other publishers, was faring poorly during the Depression, and Lane was worrying about how to keep the business afloat. While he was in Exeter station waiting for his train back to London, he browsed shops looking for something good to read. He struck out. All he could find were trendy magazines and junky pulp fiction. And then he had a “Eureka!” moment: What if quality books were available at places like train stations and sold for reasonable prices—the price of a pack of cigarettes, say?

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